The Polygamist's Daughter

Stories, Reflections and Conclusions of Life on the Inside


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The Gift That Keeps On Giving

Not long ago I had no concept of the true value of giving and the internal joy and self-satisfaction that come with it.

As a child I gave merely out of expectation and sometimes coercion. There was never enough of anything to go around and that feeling of lack prevented me being able to give with any semblance gratitude. As I grew older I gave begrudgingly, knowing that anything I gave away meant significant loss for me. A few years ago when I began to consciously use gratitude to change every aspect of my life I saw that giving with gratitude made giving pleasurable. And, in giving from gratitude I received an abundance of joy. Not only did I receive joy but I had an inner sense that all is well and I would always have enough. Now I fully understand that when I give from gratitude the universe rewards me with more abundance and inner fulfillment then I would have ever had otherwise.

“The value of a man resides in what he gives and not in what he is capable of receiving.”  – Albert Einsteingift-giving

At the core of every human being is the desire for love and acceptance which ultimately translates into a need for connection. As social beings, connection to other loving beings (human or animal) is one of our most basic human needs, right up there with food and water. Without expressions of love we become lifeless. Lack of feeling love and acceptance can lead to depression and even suicide.

Giving and receiving are an outward way that love and appreciation are expressed. This form of expression is so vital to our well-being that we have created entire celebrations around reciprocation.

The act of giving is a natural anti-depressant and creates an emotional high when the giving is truly from the heart. For the rest of the story click HERE.

Until next time, be fearless, fabulous and free. 

Victoria Reynolds Signature

 


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Christmas in the Commune

When our commune was first established the founding elders agreed that there would be no recognition or celebration of holidays based in Pagan tradition. That included Christmas.

My father referred to Christmas as a “filthy Pagan ritual” and refused to expose his children to its customs. As a child I was far too young to understand the true meaning of either the holiday or my father’s opinion of its formation. Growing up I knew the birth of Jesus was in April and we celebrated his birth each year with great enthusiasm. Aside from a small gift provided by my grandparents, Christmas went by each year with no fan fare or acknowledgement.

As I became an adult and enjoyed the fruits of the real world I fell in love with Christmas. I fell in love with the lights, the music, the food and the energy. But I still had no connection with it in regards to Jesus. It was a Pagan celebration of joy and giving and I was perfectly accepting of that. I was anti-religion and wanted nothing to do with any religious aspect of the holidays. Then I matured and discovered the truth of Spirituality. I rediscovered Christ and his teachings of light. I am not a Christian and have no attachments to the birth of Christ. Although I do celebrate his life and his messages along with the other celebrations during this time of year. I have finally come to understand the true meaning of Christmas and the joyous celebration this season represents.

My father was right about the Pagan foundation of Christmas, although I completely disagree about it being based in evil practices. Religious scholars all agree that Jesus was not born in December, so why did the Catholic Church choose December 25th? It is really quite simple. December 21st is the winter solstice, the day that the promise of light returns each year to our planet. The weeks surrounding the winter solstice have been celebrated for thousands of years, long before the birth of Christ, by cultures all over the world. Regardless of religious, pagan or traditional beliefs this time of year has always been filled with gratitude, joy and celebration. It is a time that celebrates abundance and promises hope for the future. It is a celebration of light.

The Christmas season is not just for Christians but for people of all races, creeds and beliefs to celebrate the harvest, celebrate life’s bounty, celebrate love and yes, celebrate the return of light and hope that accompanies it. The return of light is recognized with many names and rituals, all of which are beautiful and inspiring. Regardless of the tradition they all deserve recognition and celebration. Happy Holidays!

For more information about the true history of Christmas visit the History Channel at http://www.history.com/topics/christmas